U.S. Convenience Stores Continue Growth

January 25, 2018

The industry’s core offer of convenience strongly resonates with consumers.

January 25, 2018

​ALEXANDRIA, Va. – The U.S. convenience store count increased to a record 154,958 stores as of December 31, 2017, a 0.3% increase (423 stores) from the year prior, according to the 2018 NACS/Nielsen Convenience Industry Store Count.

“Our continued store growth suggests that the convenience and fuel retailing industry’s core offer of convenience continues to resonate with customers,” said Chris Rapanick, director of business development at NACS.

“Convenience stores are the destination of choice for the 160 million customers who frequent their community convenience store each day to refresh and refuel, whether it’s to grab a quick snack and a beverage, or a fresh-prepared meal.”

The convenience store count is significantly higher than other channels of trade, accounting for more than one third (34.4%) of the brick-and-mortar retail universe tracked by Nielsen in the United States. Except for the dollar store channel, all other major channels have fewer units at year-end 2017 than 2016:

​Channel ​2016 ​2017 ​Unit Change ​% Change
Convenience Store​ ​154,535 ​154,958 ​423 ​0.3%
​Drug ​43,636 ​43,169 ​(467) ​-1.07%
​Supermarket ​51,191 ​51,134 ​(57) ​-0.11%
​Dollar ​28,832 ​30,332 ​1,500 ​5.20%

“Convenience stores saw solid growth in 2017 due to an increased focus on innovation, improved customer experience, assortment variation and healthy investments in food services,” said Jeanne Danubio, EVP retail for lead markets at Nielsen. “All of these factors have enabled convenience stores to meet the needs of consumers, stretching far beyond the pump. This shift must continue to further expand c-store’s relevance in today’s changing retail landscape. As more retailers across channels try to cater to convenience seeking consumers, c-stores will need to continue to innovate and evolve and grow to stay ahead of the curve.”

Single-store operators within the convenience retail space also increased by 139 units (0.14%), up from 97,504 stores at year-end 2016 to 97,643 stores at year-end 2017.

Overall, 79.1% of convenience stores (122,552) sell motor fuels, a decrease of 1.0% (or 1,255 stores) from 2016, with the single-store motor fuel segment dropping by 1,025 stores. The decline in the number of convenience stores selling fuel is reflective of retailers evolving their business models to focus more on the in-store, foodservice offer, as well as retailers embracing new store formats and establishing their brands in more urban, walk-up locations.

Among the states, Texas continues to lead in store count at 15,813 stores, or more than one in 10 stores in the country. California is second at 11,946 stores, followed by Florida (9,891), New York (8,725), Georgia (6,687), North Carolina (6,235), Ohio (5,686), Michigan (4,962), Pennsylvania (4, 855) and Illinois (4,759). The bottom three states in terms of store count are Alaska (217 stores), Wyoming (355) and Delaware (344).

The U.S. convenience store count has increased by 55% over the last three decades: At year-end 1987, the convenience store count was 100,200 stores, at year-end 1997 the store count was 108,800 stores and at year-end 2007 the store count was 146,294 stores.

NACS Article – Click here

Thanks @NACSonline for another great article.

And to the 423 new stores – call Insight Retail Software for your backOffice and scan data needs! We are the premiere provider for Scan Data Services!



Work $marter, Not harder with backOffice Software™

July 20, 2017

An interesting read from NACS Daily as it speaks of Wal-Mart stores using a “machine” to count their currency as opposed to an employee. Nobody wants to see lost jobs, however our ‘machines’ can greatly improve the bottom line. Running a business is hard. Running a small business is even harder.  

“Small Business” is a term that I believe is relative.  I remember years ago my friend owned a 79′ Chris Craft Yacht and his young son felt oh so proud that his daddy had such a HUGE boat.  But when my friend took his boat to Miami the young son said,

“Daddy!  Look at that boat – it’s so BIG”.

Mr. H said “Son, there’s always a bigger boat”.  

This is true for so many things.  There’s always a bigger business, a bigger store or a bigger budget.  The goal is to be successful no matter the size of your business. 

So, what’s the point in all of this?  Like Wal-Mart, don’t pay an employee to do a job that can be done [in a fraction of the time, at a fraction of the cost] by a machine.  The machine you need for your business is backOffice™ Software from Insight Retail Software.   

Do NOT have an employee spending hours………..

  • receiving an order from your vendor – use our EDI Module.
  • entering and attempting to submit data to Altria for Scan Data Incentive – use our Scan Data Service
  • entering and attempting to submit data to RJR for Scan Data Incentive – use our Scan Data Service
  • changing 100’s of Cigarette prices one at a time – use our GROUP CHANGE feature
  • wondering if your margins are correct – use our backOffice™ Software Reports

……. and the list goes on and on.

Our backOffice™ Software [AKA The Machine] will pay for itself in a very short time. Remember, Wal-Mart started with one store in Newport, Arkansas. They were a “Small Business”.


 Call Chris @ 518-633-4111 x 108 for more information.

Article from Nacs Daily – click here



Increasingly, more retailers are automating certain workplace tasks.
July 20, 2017

​NEW YORK – When a Walmart store began using the Cash360 machine to count currency, and digitally deposit the money at the bank, the retailer also replaced a task previously assigned to a human, who made $13 an hour counting cash and tracking the accuracy of the store’s book, writes the Wall Street Journal.

“They think it will be a more efficient way to process the money,” the employee, who has worked with Walmart for a decade, told the news source.

Nearly 4,700 of Walmart’s U.S. stores have a Cash360 machine, notes the Journal, which is making thousands of positions obsolete. Employees whose job function has been replaced by the machine have moved to other positions or left the company. “The role of service and customer-facing associates will always be there,” Judith McKenna, Walmart’s U.S. chief operating officer, told the news source, adding, “there are interesting developments in technology that mean those roles shift and change over time.”

Meanwhile, some economists say that many retail jobs can and should be automated. A 2015 Citi Research report found that two-thirds of U.S. retail jobs are at “high risk” of disappearing by 2030. “The primary predictor for automation is how routine a task is,” said Ebrahim Rahbari, an economist at Citi Research. “A big issue is that retail is a sizable percentage of the workforce.”

The Journal writes that self-checkout lanes “can replace cashiers. Autonomous vehicles could handle package delivery or warehouse inventory. Even more complex tasks like suggesting what toy or shirt a shopper might want could be handled by a computer with access to a shopper’s buying history, similar to what already happens online today.”

Automation is filtering through the retail industry. For example, Home Depot has self-checkouts in most stores and is testing handheld scanners for larger items like lumber. “We want to simplify the stores so that we can free up our associates…so they can focus on selling,” Carol Tomé, CFO of Home Depot, told the Journal.

CNBC also reports that half of American jobs are at risk from automation, according to a new study by Ball State University’s Center for Business and Economic Research. “How Vulnerable are American Communities to Automation, Trade, and Urbanization?” combines several recent studies on employment trends to present a stark view of the future job situation for certain parts of the United States, notes the news source.

Scan Data Services: Your Key To Higher Tobacco Profits

July 19, 2017

Altria’s PM USA 2017 Retail Leaders Program and RJ Reynolds Scan Data Reporting Program offer quarterly rebates to retailers who submit transaction-level scan data (“Scan Data”) from their Point of Sale on a daily basis. Enrollment in these programs also entitle you to take advantage of other programs such as multi-pack discounts and loyalty incentives.

InsightRS is offering the Scan Data Service that will allow you to take advantage of this great opportunity for more profit from your tobacco sales. Using our automated daily process, we submit the necessary data for you to comply with the program requirements. We collect either 25% of your quarterly rebate or $25/month per store for providing this service.


Compete In Your Market

Gain Access To Multi-Pack Discounts And Loyalty Funds

  • Inclusion in Scan Data Program enables you to offer Multi-Pack Discounts
  • Optional Loyalty Program entitles you to offer addition discounts to your customers

We Do All Of The Work

Our Fully-Automated Service Does All Of The Work


Call Chris today – 518 633 4111 x 108

Visit our website for more information:  Click here!



Tobacco Rebate Programs with Scan Data Huge Success

March 22, 2017

wow Altria Scan Data ProgramWow! JUST WOW!

Altria and RJR’s Tobacco Rebate Programs are a huge success.  We want to welcome all of the many new customers from coast-to-coast to the program!


The rebate program allows bigger profits in a very competitive tobacco market. The best news is that Insight Retail Software does ALL of the work for you. Once you sign up with your Altria and RJR reps we do the hard part.

SDS_Program Brochure

Smoking RebatesWE DO ALL THE WORK

Our iC5 Program collects data from your POS daily and transmits the files to our secure server.  These files are processed and archived.



Once a week our server generates and sends a file for processing to IRI [for Altria] and MSA [for RJR].

Congrats — you have now met your weekly requirement.

Smoking Rebates



SIGN UP TODAY — The store down the road did!


518 – 633 – 4111  x  108



wow Altria Scan Data Program


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