It’s summertime, it’s travel time. Tips for traveling with kids.

July 10, 2017

We are full into our summer and travel time is at it’s peak. As you travel our wonderful country  here are a few tips for success with kids.  Thank you Sarah Martin Hood for this great article.  sarahmartinhood

Don’t forget to stop into your favorite C-Stores along the way!  C-Stores are the key to successful travel!


Are your kids carrying their own weight when you travel? 

Summer vacations are in full swing and it’s high time the youngest travelers in your party start carrying their own weight, don’t you think? If you’re committed to traveling with your kiddos, it’s a good idea to start as early as possible and find ways for them to help out from Point A to Point B and all the adventures between. Where do you start? How do you get your littles to be helpers as you travel?

 

Make kids carry their own bag.

This may require some patience on your part, but kids can maneuver a suitcase on wheels younger than you might think. They’ll need help with escalators and trains and such, but let them try. And even before they’re able to help with a full-size suitcase, they can be responsible for a carry-on. A water bottle, book, and a snack is really all they need to carry in a small backpack. When you’re out for the day add a camera and a rain jacket.  None of it weighs much, and it will introduce them to the concept of packing smart — and light!

LAX - May 2017

Give them a job to do.

Find tangible ways for kids to be helpful. One of our go-to jobs for Colt is “Outlet Check!” Before we leave a hotel room, he’s responsible for sweeping the room and checking every single outlet for charging cords. We donate far fewer chargers to hotels since he took up this job!

Packing is tricky for kids because they’re not sure where to start. If you want their help packing, be very specific. They won’t know what to do if you say “Pack your suitcase.” But they can help if you break it down to “Lay out your swimsuit and goggles.” and give them one step at a time.

In general, be on the lookout for things they can do themselves. Let them hand their own boarding pass to the gate agent before a flight, encourage them to order for themselves off the menu, and if they have a question during a tour — have them raise their own little hand and ask. Let them be a traveler instead of just a passenger.

 

Make it a game.

Yes, they can even help entertain themselves! If your kids are collectors or writers — keep your eyes open for kid-friendly projects as you travel. One of my favorites is the passport offered by the National Park Service that lets kids collect cancellation stamps from park rangers and it gives them an incredible keepsake of their travels. (This is not just for kids! I’m actually super jealous and wish I’d started myself a passport years ago!)

Another example we discovered was at Mount Vernon last fall.  On the iPod touch that served as our audio tour guide, there was an app for Colt to play a spy game — he collected clues all over the property and answered trivia questions about the area. He was into being there anyway, but the spy game was a nice cherry on top of the experience. It kept him engaged from start to finish.

Statue of Liberty - July 2016

Give your kid a camera.

On top of the benefits they will enjoy by having their own way to document the trip, this is a sneaky way to get a fresh perspective on your destination. I have been amazed by the photos on Colt’s camera at the end of a day of sightseeing — the details he noticed and the perspective he captured. Sometimes he snaps away and other times the camera stays in his bag, but giving him the responsibility of his own camera has taught him about storytelling and even given us opportunities to talk about tourist etiquette a few times.

The earlier the better when it comes to teaching kids that travel is a fun adventure but there are ways for everyone to chip in so the trip is safe and fun for the whole group. Think of your kiddo as a fellow traveler and he will rise to the challenge.

 National Mall, Washington D.C. - September 2016
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PROPOSED SNAP RULE COULD MAKE C-STORES INELIGIBLE

March 10, 2016

NACS reaches out to Capitol Hill to protest changes around definition of staple foods.

March 10, 2016

​ALEXANDRIA, Va. – This week NACS told policymakers about industry concerns with a proposed rule published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture that includes problematic new eligibility standards for retailers participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

“The proposed [SNAP] rule would make tens of thousands of small businesses ineligible to participate in the Program. Small businesses will be harmed and SNAP beneficiaries, who rely on these small stores in both urban and rural environments, will lose options they need to feed their families,” wrote NACS in a letter to the chairman and ranking member of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration and Related Agencies, and the chairman and ranking member of the House Agriculture Committee.

As previously reported by NACS, on February 17, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food & Nutrition Service (FNS) published a proposed rule altering eligibility requirements for retailers participating in SNAP. While the proposal codifies the 2014 Farm Bill provisions, which NACS supported, it also makes other changes to retailer eligibility requirements that Congress never intended to address in the 2014 Farm Bill. The proposal would impede neighborhood retailers’ ability to participate in the program, which in turn would hinder food accessibility for SNAP recipients that use their benefits at these small format retail locations.

“It appears that FNS is trying to push small retailers out of the SNAP program altogether, for no sound public policy reason,” NACS wrote to Congress, adding that Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services Undersecretary Kevin Concannon recently testified before the House Appropriations Committee that there are more small stores participating in SNAP “than we really need.”

The USDA’s SNAP proposal codifies the 2014 Farm Bill “depth of stock” provisions, which require retailers to stock 7 varieties of products in each of the four “staple food” categories. Problematically, the proposal also includes several changes that were neither required nor envisioned by the 2014 Farm Bill.

The proposal redefines the term “staple foods” and limits the items that may count as staple foods for depth of stock determinations. Under the proposal, multiple ingredient items (e.g. soups or frozen dinners) would not count towards depth of stock requirements. The proposal also expands the definition of “accessory foods” to include foods consumed between meals, like snacks (e.g. hummus and pretzel packs).

Because accessory and multiple ingredient foods may not be counted as staple foods for depth of stock determinations—the proposal essentially narrows the universe of acceptable foods that a retailer can stock to participate in SNAP, ultimately raising the stocking numbers beyond the numbers established by Congress.

Next week in Washington during the NACS Government Relations Conference, industry stakeholders will be communicating to members of Congress and their staffs that convenience stores play a fundamental role in SNAP, particularly for low-income Americans who live in rural or urban environments. By making it increasingly difficult for small format retailers to participate in SNAP, the proposal would essentially punish SNAP beneficiaries by requiring them to travel outside of their local neighborhoods where larger format retailers may not exist.

A memorandum analyzing the proposal is available online exclusively for NACS members.


EDI Manager now available with your backOffice™ Software

August 28, 2013

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WANT TO SAVE SOME SERIOUS TIME?

Insight Retail Software  is proud to announce the release of EDI Manager.  Almost every vendor can supply you with an electronic invoice of your order, and our new EDI Manager allows you to import these invoices directly into backOffice™.

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Just another way to run your business more effectively and save you time.

For more information please complete the form below.  Thank you!


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