BACKUP YOUR DATA!

March 30, 2016

 

spring-clipart

That means spring forward

change the batteries on the smoke detectors

and

   —   BACKUP YOUR DATA   —

Backing up your data is like flossing your teeth.

You don’t have to floss them all

 just the ones you want to keep.

backup-backup

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PROPOSED SNAP RULE COULD MAKE C-STORES INELIGIBLE

March 10, 2016

NACS reaches out to Capitol Hill to protest changes around definition of staple foods.

March 10, 2016

​ALEXANDRIA, Va. – This week NACS told policymakers about industry concerns with a proposed rule published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture that includes problematic new eligibility standards for retailers participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

“The proposed [SNAP] rule would make tens of thousands of small businesses ineligible to participate in the Program. Small businesses will be harmed and SNAP beneficiaries, who rely on these small stores in both urban and rural environments, will lose options they need to feed their families,” wrote NACS in a letter to the chairman and ranking member of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration and Related Agencies, and the chairman and ranking member of the House Agriculture Committee.

As previously reported by NACS, on February 17, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food & Nutrition Service (FNS) published a proposed rule altering eligibility requirements for retailers participating in SNAP. While the proposal codifies the 2014 Farm Bill provisions, which NACS supported, it also makes other changes to retailer eligibility requirements that Congress never intended to address in the 2014 Farm Bill. The proposal would impede neighborhood retailers’ ability to participate in the program, which in turn would hinder food accessibility for SNAP recipients that use their benefits at these small format retail locations.

“It appears that FNS is trying to push small retailers out of the SNAP program altogether, for no sound public policy reason,” NACS wrote to Congress, adding that Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services Undersecretary Kevin Concannon recently testified before the House Appropriations Committee that there are more small stores participating in SNAP “than we really need.”

The USDA’s SNAP proposal codifies the 2014 Farm Bill “depth of stock” provisions, which require retailers to stock 7 varieties of products in each of the four “staple food” categories. Problematically, the proposal also includes several changes that were neither required nor envisioned by the 2014 Farm Bill.

The proposal redefines the term “staple foods” and limits the items that may count as staple foods for depth of stock determinations. Under the proposal, multiple ingredient items (e.g. soups or frozen dinners) would not count towards depth of stock requirements. The proposal also expands the definition of “accessory foods” to include foods consumed between meals, like snacks (e.g. hummus and pretzel packs).

Because accessory and multiple ingredient foods may not be counted as staple foods for depth of stock determinations—the proposal essentially narrows the universe of acceptable foods that a retailer can stock to participate in SNAP, ultimately raising the stocking numbers beyond the numbers established by Congress.

Next week in Washington during the NACS Government Relations Conference, industry stakeholders will be communicating to members of Congress and their staffs that convenience stores play a fundamental role in SNAP, particularly for low-income Americans who live in rural or urban environments. By making it increasingly difficult for small format retailers to participate in SNAP, the proposal would essentially punish SNAP beneficiaries by requiring them to travel outside of their local neighborhoods where larger format retailers may not exist.

A memorandum analyzing the proposal is available online exclusively for NACS members.


Independent Grocers Taking Aim at C-stores

March 4, 2016

NGA Show session highlights how three grocers are going after convenience.

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March 1, 2016, 03:07 pm By Joan Driggs, Stagnito Business Information

LAS VEGAS — Independent grocers have convenience stores on their radar.

An educational session at this week’s The 2016 NGA Show, hosted by the National Grocers Association (NGA), discussed the need for independent grocers to compete against convenience stores and provided some key takeaways on how to successfully do so.

Panelists representing leading independent grocers such as Niemann Foods, Buche Foods and Docs Food Stores pointed out that convenience stores are continually upping their food retailing game with more grab-and-go and fresh prepared items. Independent grocers need to stay competitive to remain the go-to destination for shoppers, whether they’re on a weekly fill-up trip or a quick stop on their way from work.

Nine-store chain Docs Food Stores, based in Bixby, Okla., has moved many convenience items to the front of its stores, including beverages and quick meals, according to speaker Courtney Brown, vice president and chief operating officer. The chain also added an express register to help customers make a quick purchase, he shared.

Additionally, Docs takes advantage of low-priced meal deals from its hot bar and utilizes outdoor seasonal displays — such as a farm-stand truck — to communicate that its stores have more to offer than traditional convenience stores.

Brown stressed that having enough staffing is critical because customers don’t want to wait in line ever, but especially when they’re on a quick trip, it could be a deal breaker.

RF Buche, president of Buche Foods, a South Dakota chain of grocery and convenience stores (some of which offer fuel) told NGA Show attendees that rethinking your basic grocery retail strategies is key to success. Appealing to convenience shoppers means putting yourself in their shoes — not just in terms of what assortment might appeal, but also the experience.

Clean bathrooms are not to be underestimated, he noted. Buche Foods brags that it cleans its restrooms seven times a day. The company has even hosted manager bathroom-decorating contests.

Niemann Foods, based in Quincy, Ill., has about 100 stores under its umbrella, including grocery, convenience, hardware and pet stores. Rich Niemann III, director of convenience operations, discussed the company’s recent evolution in its convenience business.

The company underwent an evaluation about five years ago to determine the best place to invest and reinvent. The result is Harvest Market, two convenience stores with a focus on fresh prepared foods.

Harvest Market features sandwiches, soups and other fresh items prepared daily; hot and cold fountain beverages; and self-serve Sweet Berry frozen yogurt and toppings.

Like Buche Foods, Harvest Market makes use of its fuel operations to drive customers into the store. “Consider that 60-70 percent of fuel customers might not go inside,” Niemann said.

The company makes use of extensive advertising at the fuel pumps to promote meal deals and other items that are typically not available at convenience stores. “Fresh really sets the tone,” he said, and helps the company bounce its convenience shoppers to grocery shoppers.

The 2016 NGA Show is taking place Feb. 28 through March 2 at Las Vegas’ Mirage Hotel & Casino. The annual event brings together independent retailers and wholesalers, food retail industry executives, food/consumer packaged goods manufacturers, and service providers for opportunities to learn, engage, share, network and innovate.

The National Grocers Association is the only industry association devoted exclusively to the needs of independent grocers.

By Joan Driggs, Stagnito Business Information
  • About Joan DriggsJoan Driggs is Editorial Director of Progressive Grocer and Progressive Grocer Independent. She has more than 25 years of experience in trade journalism and market research. Joan enjoys connecting with CPG manufacturers and grocery retailers, and learning how they connect for the benefit of consumers. Her roots are in new product development and she continues to seek out the latest in greatest at grocery retail. To connect with Joan, email jdriggs@stagnitomail.com, or reach out on Twitter, @JoanPGrocer.

– See more at: http://www.csnews.com/industry-news-and-trends/competitive-watch/independent-grocers-taking-aim-c-stores?cc=3#sthash.QglNprIZ.9oqakXrR.dpuf


Ever Heard of Advocacy Cards?

February 26, 2016

You haven’t, because they don’t yet exist. Read on to find out if the concept is something you should consider for your operation.

Advocacy cards. They don’t have quite the same ring as loyalty cards do, but maybe get used to the idea?

While advocacy cards are not a living, breathing thing, advocating for customers is fast becoming the new way retailers should approach customer relationship-building beyond simple loyalty efforts.

While a loyalty card program rewards consumers for quantity of goods and services bought, advocacy cards could go a step further to inform the qualitative aspect of the retailer-customer bond— rewarding shoppers who buy healthy foods, for example, with points, gift cards or other incentives.

Sounds like a daunting task for a retailer, but it’s one that all retail channels should think about.

Retailer advocacy for customers was discussed during the webinar “Top Food Trends for 2016.” Sponsored by The Food Institute and BMO Harris, the session was comoderated by Phil Lempert, known as the “SupermarketGuru,” and The Food Institute CEO Brian Todd.

In addition to citing consumers’ thirst for additional product information along with coming to grips that the “retail world is in flux,” Lempert said advocacy might be the new loyalty. In that spirit, “focus beyond relationships and think beyond loyalty to advocacy,” he said.

Your consumers are already vigilant when it comes to the food selection process—like vetting a political candidate. They abide by concepts of “free from” and “less is more,” the latter meaning products with five or fewer ingredients and no artificial ingredients. Foods labeled with health attributes saw sales increase 13%, said Lempert, citing the National Grocers Association-SupermarketGuru 2015 survey.

The broad picture: A new way of eating will be defined by new proteins, algae, insects, vegetable, yeast, cricket flour and nut powders. Rewarding your customers for participating in the trend could incentivize those higher-margin items, and earn you goodwill and higher sales in the process.

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EDI Manager now available with your backOffice™ Software

August 28, 2013

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WANT TO SAVE SOME SERIOUS TIME?

Insight Retail Software  is proud to announce the release of EDI Manager.  Almost every vendor can supply you with an electronic invoice of your order, and our new EDI Manager allows you to import these invoices directly into backOffice™.

Once imported, backOffice™ will identify new products received in the order, any price or cost changes and the quantity shipped of each item.  With the click of a button, new items are added, price and cost changes are made, and an order is created in the inventory module!

Just another way to run your business more effectively and save you time.

For more information please complete the form below.  Thank you!


Do Better with backOffice™ Software from Insight Retail Software

January 28, 2013

A new customer to Insight reported that backOffice™ just saved him $280 because as he was adding in a purchase order from Lay’s he realized they were not giving him the items at the agreed upon sale price so he was actually selling the items below his cost.

Want your business to DO BETTER? Visit http://insightrs.com for more information and give us a call at 518.633.4111

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Reno Sparks Indian Colony Selects backOffice™ Software for their Chain of Smoke Shops

November 15, 2012

About the Tribe:

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony is a federally recognized Indian Tribe located near Reno and Sparks, Nevada. The tribal membership consists of over 900 members from three Great Basin Tribes – the Paiute, the Shoshone, and the Washoe. They make up the majority of people who live within the reservation land base. The reservation lands consist of the original twenty-eight acre residential Colony located in downtown Reno and the 1,960 acre Hungry Valley reservation located nineteen miles north of the downtown Colony, in a more rural setting.

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony was established in the early 1900’s and formed a more formal Tribal Government in 1935 under the Indian Reorganization Act. With the approval of a Tribal Constitution, they elected their first Tribal Council governing body.

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony is a growing organization employing approximately three hundred people and is progressively taking steps to provide for the needs of the people while, at the same time, maintaining their culture and protecting their Sovereignty.

Latest News:

At the RSIC Tribal Council Meeting in September, backOffice™ Software from Insight Retail Software was selected as the back office software for their chain of 5 Smoke Shops and 1 HQ – location.  We are very excited to work with our dealer Best Cash Registers in Reno, Nevada on this install that has begun this week.  backOffice™ Software will work with Datasym ECR’s in 5 locations to provide a Multi-Store integration that will run from their Retail Operations [HQ] location.  RSIC is replacing outdated back office software that no longer met their needs.

We welcome RSIC and are proud to work with Paul Hoffman at Best Cash Registers!  For more infomation on backOffice™ Software visit our website.  http://insightRS.com

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