What will Tomorrow’s Gas Stations look like? InsightRS will be ready!

May 26, 2017

NACS Online has this great article about the changing look of Gas Stations, aka C-Stores.  As the look and operations change, Insight Retail Software and backOffice™ Software changes too.  Our state of the art reporting keeps you informed of the health and operation of your business.  Inventory Control, EDI, Group Price Changes are made simple with backOffice™.  Scan Data services are an added bonus.  Our customers love to log onto their Altria and RJ Reynolds account and see $$$$.  Call to get your free money too.

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Call Chris at: 518-633-4111 x 108

WHAT WILL TOMORROW’S GAS STATIONS LOOK LIKE?

Oil companies experiment with mobile apps, delivery and foodservice as analysts predict a future with declining demand for gasoline.Tags: Trends

May 26, 2017

​IRVING, Texas – The world’s largest oil companies are tinkering with what makes a gas station, as mobile apps, fuel delivery, alternative fuels and foodservice become more prominent and consumers look for even more convenience, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Analysts like the firm Wood Mackenzie are forecasting softening demand for gasoline as electric cars become more popular and fuel efficiency improves. Automated cars and vehicle sharing also will likely impact the gasoline station industry.

Over the next year and a half, Royal Dutch Shell will play around with adapting fuel stations to provide hydrogen, electric chargers and liquefied natural gas alongside gasoline. BP already has 50 locations with electric chargers globally, while France’s Total SA will put in 300 charging stations throughout Europe and 400 hydrogen pumps in Germany by 2023. Exxon Mobile is working on a new gasoline aimed at more fuel-efficient cars.

While many of these companies jettisoned retail station ownership recently, now some of them are opening new gas stations or revamping current ones with an eye to the emerging alternative fuel markets. For example, BP will open 200 stations in Mexico and as many as 3,500 in India in the coming years. Many of its U.K. stations have Marks & Spencer food locations too. “Fifteen years ago it was just fuel,” said Alex Jensen, vice president for BP’s retail arm in Europe. Today, half of the company’s U.K. customers stop by for food, not fuel.

Shell has a mobile app that lets consumers pay for gas with their phone and might install lockers for online order pickup. The company is also considering a restaurant concept to bolster its convenience food. Shell also began a pilot fuel-delivery service in the Netherlands, where customers can request a Shell fill up delivered to wherever their car is parked, via a company-developed app.

see NACS online article here

 

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Just for fun – take a minute to stop and smile!

March 14, 2017

Sometimes it’s nice to step away from EMV and Blizzards and all things political to just smile.  Perhaps have a Coke and a smile.  This guy turned 11 yesterday and is in our circle of family operated business.  He’s the smartest and kindest kid I know.

 

Happy 11th to Evan Phillips.

I want to be like you when I grow up.

evan


Independent Grocers Taking Aim at C-stores

March 4, 2016

NGA Show session highlights how three grocers are going after convenience.

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March 1, 2016, 03:07 pm By Joan Driggs, Stagnito Business Information

LAS VEGAS — Independent grocers have convenience stores on their radar.

An educational session at this week’s The 2016 NGA Show, hosted by the National Grocers Association (NGA), discussed the need for independent grocers to compete against convenience stores and provided some key takeaways on how to successfully do so.

Panelists representing leading independent grocers such as Niemann Foods, Buche Foods and Docs Food Stores pointed out that convenience stores are continually upping their food retailing game with more grab-and-go and fresh prepared items. Independent grocers need to stay competitive to remain the go-to destination for shoppers, whether they’re on a weekly fill-up trip or a quick stop on their way from work.

Nine-store chain Docs Food Stores, based in Bixby, Okla., has moved many convenience items to the front of its stores, including beverages and quick meals, according to speaker Courtney Brown, vice president and chief operating officer. The chain also added an express register to help customers make a quick purchase, he shared.

Additionally, Docs takes advantage of low-priced meal deals from its hot bar and utilizes outdoor seasonal displays — such as a farm-stand truck — to communicate that its stores have more to offer than traditional convenience stores.

Brown stressed that having enough staffing is critical because customers don’t want to wait in line ever, but especially when they’re on a quick trip, it could be a deal breaker.

RF Buche, president of Buche Foods, a South Dakota chain of grocery and convenience stores (some of which offer fuel) told NGA Show attendees that rethinking your basic grocery retail strategies is key to success. Appealing to convenience shoppers means putting yourself in their shoes — not just in terms of what assortment might appeal, but also the experience.

Clean bathrooms are not to be underestimated, he noted. Buche Foods brags that it cleans its restrooms seven times a day. The company has even hosted manager bathroom-decorating contests.

Niemann Foods, based in Quincy, Ill., has about 100 stores under its umbrella, including grocery, convenience, hardware and pet stores. Rich Niemann III, director of convenience operations, discussed the company’s recent evolution in its convenience business.

The company underwent an evaluation about five years ago to determine the best place to invest and reinvent. The result is Harvest Market, two convenience stores with a focus on fresh prepared foods.

Harvest Market features sandwiches, soups and other fresh items prepared daily; hot and cold fountain beverages; and self-serve Sweet Berry frozen yogurt and toppings.

Like Buche Foods, Harvest Market makes use of its fuel operations to drive customers into the store. “Consider that 60-70 percent of fuel customers might not go inside,” Niemann said.

The company makes use of extensive advertising at the fuel pumps to promote meal deals and other items that are typically not available at convenience stores. “Fresh really sets the tone,” he said, and helps the company bounce its convenience shoppers to grocery shoppers.

The 2016 NGA Show is taking place Feb. 28 through March 2 at Las Vegas’ Mirage Hotel & Casino. The annual event brings together independent retailers and wholesalers, food retail industry executives, food/consumer packaged goods manufacturers, and service providers for opportunities to learn, engage, share, network and innovate.

The National Grocers Association is the only industry association devoted exclusively to the needs of independent grocers.

By Joan Driggs, Stagnito Business Information
  • About Joan DriggsJoan Driggs is Editorial Director of Progressive Grocer and Progressive Grocer Independent. She has more than 25 years of experience in trade journalism and market research. Joan enjoys connecting with CPG manufacturers and grocery retailers, and learning how they connect for the benefit of consumers. Her roots are in new product development and she continues to seek out the latest in greatest at grocery retail. To connect with Joan, email jdriggs@stagnitomail.com, or reach out on Twitter, @JoanPGrocer.

– See more at: http://www.csnews.com/industry-news-and-trends/competitive-watch/independent-grocers-taking-aim-c-stores?cc=3#sthash.QglNprIZ.9oqakXrR.dpuf


Convenience Stores Offer More Convenience

February 23, 2016

Convenience Stores Sell Time

Convenience stores offer speed of service to time-starved consumers who want to get in and out of the store quickly. These shoppers recognize this channel of trade for its convenient locations, extended hours of operation, one-stop shopping, grab-and-go foodservice, variety of merchandise and fast transactions.

The average convenience store is 2,744 square feet. New stores are bigger, with 3,590 square feet, with about 2,582 square feet of sales area and about 1,008 square feet of non-sales area — a nod to retailers recognizing the importance of creating destinations within the store that require additional space — whether coffee islands, foodservice areas with seating or financial services kiosks. Convenience stores also have expanded their offerings over the last few years, with stores become part supermarket, restaurant, gas station and even a bank or drugstore. (NACS State of the Industry data)

The convenience store industry is America’s primary source for fuel. Overall, 83.5% of convenience stores (127,588 total) sell motor fuels, a .7% increase (960 stores) over 2013. The growth of convenience stores selling motor fuels is nearly double the overall growth in the industry, as fuels retailers added convenience operations and convenience retailers added fueling operations.

Convenience stores have an unmatched speed of transaction: The average time it takes a customer to walk in, purchase an item and depart is between 3 to 4 minutes. Here’s the breakdown: 35 seconds to walk from the car to the store, 71 seconds to select item(s), 42 seconds to wait in line to pay, 21 seconds to pay and 44 seconds to leave store. (NACS Speed Metrics Research, 2002)

The convenience store industry is a destination for food and refreshments. With falling revenues from fuels and tobacco products, foodservice sales are increasingly becoming convenience stores’ most profitable category. In fact, convenience store foodservice is roughly a $41 billion industry contributing 19.4% to in-store sales in 2014 (NACS State of the Industry Report of 2014 Data).

Convenience stores are everywhere. There are 152,794 convenience stores in the United States — one per every 2,095 people. Other competing channels have far fewer stores, such as supermarkets (41,529 stores), drugstores (41,799 stores), and dollar stores (26,572). (Source: Nielsen, as of December 31, 2014)

Consumers are embracing convenience stores like never before. An average store selling fuel has around 1,100 customers per day, or more than 400,000 per year. Cumulatively, the U.S. convenience store industry alone serves nearly 160 million customers per day, and 58 billion customers every year.

Self-serve at the pump is a part of most convenience stores’ fueling operations. The first self-serve gas station was opened by Hoosier Petroleum Co. in 1930, but was closed by the fire marshal as being a fire hazard. Frank Ulrich reintroduced the idea in 1947 at the corner of Jilson and Atlantic in Los Angeles. Modern self-service began in 1964 with the introduction of remote fueling; an attendant was no longer required to reset the pumps after each transaction. Today it is now available in 48 states. (New Jersey and Oregon still require full-service operations; New Jersey’s law was enacted in 1949; Oregon’s in 1951.)​

http://www.nacsonline.com/Research/FactSheets/scopeofindustry/pages/convenience.aspx

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What is EDI (Electronic Data Interchange)?

January 14, 2016

What is EDI? Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) is the computer-to-computer exchange of business documents in a standard electronic format between business partners.

By moving from a paper-based exchange of business document to one that is electronic, businesses enjoy major benefits such as reduced cost, increased processing speed, reduced errors and improved relationships with business partners. Learn more about the benefits of EDI here. »

Each term in the definition is significant:

  • Computer-to-computer– EDI replaces postal mail, fax and email. While email is also an electronic approach, the documents exchanged via email must still be handled by people rather than computers. Having people involved slows down the processing of the documents and also introduces errors. Instead, EDI documents can flow straight through to the appropriate application on the receiver’s computer (e.g., the Order Management System) and processing can begin immediately. A typical manual process looks like this, with lots of paper and people involvement:
    Manual EDI (Electronic Data Interchange) Document Exchange
    The EDI process looks like this — no paper, no people involved:
    EDI (Electronic Data Interchange) Document Exchange
  • Business documents – These are any of the documents that are typically exchanged between businesses. The most common documents exchanged via EDI are purchase orders, invoices and advance ship notices. But there are many, many others such as bill of lading, customs documents, inventory documents, shipping status documents and payment documents.
  • Standard format– Because EDI documents must be processed by computers rather than humans, a standard format must be used so that the computer will be able to read and understand the documents. A standard format describes what each piece of information is and in what format (e.g., integer, decimal, mmddyy). Without a standard format, each company would send documents using its company-specific format and, much as an English-speaking person probably doesn’t understand Japanese, the receiver’s computer system doesn’t understand the company-specific format of the sender’s format.
    • There are several EDI standards in use today, including ANSI, EDIFACT, TRADACOMS and ebXML. And, for each standard there are many different versions, e.g., ANSI 5010 or EDIFACT version D12, Release A. When two businesses decide to exchange EDI documents, they must agree on the specific EDI standard and version.
    • Businesses typically use an EDI translator – either as in-house software or via an EDI service provider – to translate the EDI format so the data can be used by their internal applications and thus enable straight through processing of documents.
  • Business partners – The exchange of EDI documents is typically between two different companies, referred to as business partners or trading partners. For example, Company A may buy goods from Company B. Company A sends orders to Company B. Company A and Company B are business partners.

Source credit:

What is EDI (Electronic Data Interchange)?

 


Grow Your Business with Doyles Sheehan and Insight Retail Software

June 13, 2014


doyles logo

For more than 35 years, Doyles Sheehan has been a full-service distributor of food service, convenience and grocery products to a diverse customer base throughout the greater Northwest. DS has customers throughout Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota. They know how to compete effectively in the wholesale industry while always keeping their primary focus on the customer. I saw this first hand as InsightRS was invited to attend their Annual Tradeshow in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho.

This family-owned and family-operated company, is nothing short of top-notch. They reach far beyond simply selling products to their customers. They truly know the importance of traditional, dependable and superior service. They show daily that these core values, combined with sophisticated inventory, ordering, delivery and marketing systems are crucial to success for them and their customers.

So were does InsightRS fit in?

Electronic Data Interchange

or simply putEDI

EDI refers to the transfer of electronic data. Our EDI Module allows Doyles Sheehan customers to import their invoices directly into backOffice™ Software electronically from Doyles Sheehan. Gone are the days of spending HOURS on data entry to update pricing and receiving orders. Once imported, backOffice™ will identify new products received from Doyles Sheehan, any price or cost changes and the quantity shipped of each item. With the click of a button, new items are added, price and cost changes are made, and an order is created in the inventory module!

The low cost of this module added to backOffice™ Software will very quickly pay for itself in hours saved on data entry and missed price changes.  Join the other Doyles Sheehan customers and start growing your business the easy way!

Doyles Doyles TruckDoyles Warehouse  Doyles Sheehan

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Do Better with backOffice™ Software from Insight Retail Software

January 28, 2013

A new customer to Insight reported that backOffice™ just saved him $280 because as he was adding in a purchase order from Lay’s he realized they were not giving him the items at the agreed upon sale price so he was actually selling the items below his cost.

Want your business to DO BETTER? Visit http://insightrs.com for more information and give us a call at 518.633.4111

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